Research on interventions to manage land markets and limit the concentration of land ownership

The Scottish Land Commission has just published a Report which it commissioned on interventions to manage land markets and limit the concentration of land ownership in places other than Scotland. It can be accessed here (PDF here). It draws insights from suitable comparators that should, we hope, be meaningful for Scotland.

I say “we hope” because I was lucky enough to be part of the team that won the tender from the Scottish Land Commission for this contract, working with researchers at the University of the Highlands and Islands and a colleague at the University of Aberdeen. (I trailed this in an earlier blog post.)

For fear of paraphrasing our work inexpertly, I will refer you directly to the (open access) report. That begins with an Executive Summary, for those pressed for time.

One thing I will add here though is another “thank you” for all the country experts who assisted with the Report, who helped to make this is as current as feasibly possible. Our helpers from all sorts of airts and pairts are listed in an Annex to the Report.

Meanwhile, the Scottish Land Commission has also launched a discussion paper (as part of its Land Lines series) on concentration of land ownership (available here, PDF here), with an accompanying blog post here. No doubt that will attract some interest and associated responses. Meanwhile, I am part of another workstream for the Scottish Land Commission which will be looking at the experience Scottish communities have had with existing rights to buy, and I am looking forward to pressing on with that project as well.

Back in 2003, the then MSP Alasdair Morrison noted the following in the Scottish Parliament, as the (first) Land Reform (Scotland) Bill was passed into law.

Tha latha an uachdarain seachad, agus an-diugh tha achd Pàrlamaid ùr againn: Achd Ath-leasachaidh an Fhearainn (Alba) 2003. Tha e crìochnaichte.

We can allow the occasional flourish from a politician, but chan eil e crìochnaichte fhàthast. More followed in 2016. And it seems there is more to come. Stay tuned for the next edition of land reform in Scotland.

SLC Report

The report should be cited as: Glass, J., Bryce, R., Combe, M., Hutchison, N. E., Price, M. F., Schulz, L. and Valero, D. 2018. Research on interventions to manage land markets and limit the concentration of land ownership elsewhere in the world. Scottish Land Commission, Commissioned Report No 001
Advertisements

About basedrones

Bachelor of Laws. Scots lawyer working at the University of Aberdeen. English law qualified. Took far too long to write this bio. Blogs on legal issues, with occasional veering into other purportedly intellectual stuff from time to time. Tweets about legal issues, education, law clinics, fitba, music, rogue cell division and not at all about politics at @MalcolmCombe.
This entry was posted in Land Reform, Property, Scottish Land Commission and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Research on interventions to manage land markets and limit the concentration of land ownership

  1. Stuart Dalgleish says:

    “Tha latha an uachdarain seachad, agus an-diugh tha achd Pàrlamaid ùr againn: Achd Ath-leasachaidh an Fhearainn (Alba) 2003. Tha e crìochnaichte.” ….. “chan eil e crìochnaichte fhàthast” You lost me there. A translation would be helpful.

  2. basedrones says:

    “The day of the landlord is finished, and today we have an Act of our new Parliament: The Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003. It is complete.” The second bit is to negative that.

  3. Pingback: Research on the effectiveness of community ownership mechanisms in Scotland | basedrones

  4. Pingback: My 2018 in review | basedrones

  5. Pingback: Scottish Land Commission Investigation into the Issues Associated with Large scale and Concentrated Landownership in Scotland | basedrones

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s